NSA and your network

Econ Blog #1

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/29/us/nsa-examines-social-networks-of-us-citizens.html?pagewanted=1&_r=1&ref=business&

NSA is not just tracking your whereabouts, its also tracking your networks. NSA has been allowing the collection of data from phone calls, texts, and email since November 2010. Well that’s at least what they claim. NSA claims this is necessary in order to discover other terrorist within a cell or network. NSA wants these nodes to be gatekeepers and lead them to more “threats.” The was previously allowed to do this for foreigners, but now the policy applies to all Americans.

In fact, a good portion of the NSA’s budget was spent on an “Enterprise Knowledge System” that was designed to discover, connect, and correlate all the complex relationships and patterns across a diverse and massive data set. The system can discover new targets of surveillance at rapid speeds.

Remember, be careful out there because Big Brother is watching.

Advertisements

One thought on “NSA and your network”

  1. To play the Devil’s Advocate, the NSA having documentation of our networks could also have potential benefits. For example, if someone were to go missing, having that persons network mapped out could give insight to where the person may be. If all all the data about everyone’s network was efficiently mapped together, the NSA, or anyone with this data, would be able to effectively follow a path the person’s whereabouts. Say the missing person is a child who was last seen with the babysitter, the baby sitters network can be quickly brought up and the authorities could in a sense actually map out a path to where the child was most likely taken. Access to peoples personal networks can have many advantages for citizens, but to most, this lack of privacy is not worth the added benefit. I personally do not like the fact that our data is collected like this, but it would be interesting to see a situation like this play out and see someone saved because of the public knowledge of their captors personal network.

Comments are closed.